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Tarragon
Tarragon French tarragon
French tarragon
Scientific Classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(Unranked): Angiosperms
(Unranked): Eudicots
(Unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Anthemideae
Genus: Artemisia
Species: Artemisia dracunculus
Synonyms
Dragon herb
Dragon's-wort
Plant Data
Mature height: 60cm (2ft)
Mature spread: 30cm (1ft)
Growing plant spacing: 40cm (15in)
References: [1]

Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus) is a perennial herb in the family :Category:Asteraceae|Asteraceae]]. It is native to a wide area of the Northern Hemisphere from easternmost Europe across central and eastern Asia to India, western North America, and south to northern Mexico.

French tarragon is the variety generally considered best for the kitchen, whereas Russian tarragon is weaker in flavour, but is a far more hardy and vigorous plant.

PlannerEdit

J F M A M J J A S O N D
Plant (from pot-grown)
Harvest

[2][1]

GrowingEdit

LocationEdit

Choose a well-drained site in a sunny position.[2]

SoilEdit

If the soil is heavy, dig in peat or well-rotted manure or compost at the rate of a bucketful to 1m² (1yd²).[1]

PlantingEdit

An average household should only require one plant[1] so growing from a shop-bought cutting rather than raising from seed is more cost-effective. Only Russian tarragon can be grown from seed, French tarragon must be raised from a cutting.

AftercareEdit

Keep the plant well-watered during dry spells and pinch out any flowering stems as they appear[1] to ensure a supply of fresh leaves.[2]

HarvestingEdit

Harvest leaves as required from June.[1]

Long-term careEdit

Tarragon will keep growing for years once established, however it is advisable to divide and replant old stock every two or three years.[1] Dig up the plant in spring divide by hand (do not cut the underground runners). Replant 5-8cm (2-3in) deep and 40cm (15in) apart.

PreservingEdit

Cut fresh tarragon and pack into ice cube trays and store in a freezer. Use cubes as required for a year-round supply.

TroublesEdit

Tarragon is not troubled by many pests, but is susceptible to the following plant diseases:[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. a b c d e f g (1994). Food From Your Garden & Allotment. Reader's Digest Association Ltd, London. P. 218. ISBN 978276443367
  2. a b c Hessayon, D.G. (2009). The Vegetable & Herb Expert. Transworld Publishers, London. p. 138. ISBN 9780903505468
  3. Growing Tarragon. Sparky Boy Enterprises. Retrieved: 2010-09-05.
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