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Potato
King Edward
King Edward Potato
Maincrop
Suitable for:
  • Potato Dauphinoise
  • Chips
  • Roasting
  • Mashing
Waxy/Floury Scale
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Waxy
Floury
Colours
Skin Flesh
Plant Data
Resistances:
Low
High
Black dot:
· · · · · 6 · · ·
Black scurf:
· · · · · 6 · · ·
Late blight on foliage:
· · 3 · · · · · ·
Late blight on tubers:
· · · 4 · · · · ·
Powdery scab:
· · · · · · 7 · ·
Silver scurf:
· · 3 · · · · · ·
Skin spot:
· · 3 · · · · · ·
Blackleg:
· · · 4 · · · · ·
Common scab:
· · · · · · 7 · ·
Potato cyst nematode:[1]
· 2 · · · · · · ·
Potato cyst nematode:[2]
· 2 · · · · · · ·
Potato leaf roll virus
· · · · 5 · · · ·
Potato virus Y
· 2 · · · · · · ·
Bruising
· · · · · 6 · · ·
Splitting
· · · · 5 · · · ·
References: [3]

King Edward potatoes, like the majority of European and North American potato varieties, are derivatives of the 'Rough Purple Chili'[4] which was used as breeding stock after the 1840s Irish potato famine.[5] The King Edward potato is one of the oldest of these varieties. It was developed by John Butler of Scotter, Lincolnshire, and introduced to Britain in 1902. It is one of the oldest surviving varieties in Europe.[6] The Coronation of King Edward VII in 1902 coincided with the introduction of this variety of potato and its name is believed to originate as a 'commemoration' of this occasion.[5]

The King Edward potato is predominately white skinned with pink colouration. It is mostly oval in shape with a floury texture and shallow eyes.[7] The plant is upright and tall with numerous stems and small green leaves. Its flowers are purple with white tipped petals.

King Edwards are not particularly prolific in terms of yield, but many people still grow them for their floury texture and their taste.

GrowingEdit

Main article: Potato

The King Edward potato is a main crop and in the UK it is traditionally planted in April for harvest in September.[8]

It is suitable to be grown commercially or in the allotment and can even be grown in pots, although smaller first early varieties are a more advisable choice for pot cultivation.

To do well King Edwards require soil that is rich in humus (farm-yard manure/compost) in combination with feeding via a general fertiliser. It is also advisable to ensure plenty of watering during dry periods. Suggested spacing in a traditional plot are at a depth of 4in; spacing in row - 12-16in; width between rows - 28-30in.[9] It is very resistant to Potato scab and offers some resistance to Potato blight but is susceptible to Potato cyst nematode.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. Potato Cyst Nematode (Globodera pallida Pa 2/3, 1)
  2. Potato Cyst Nematode (Globodera rostochiensis Ro1)
  3. (2010). King Edward. The British Potato Variety Database. Retrieved: 2010-07-28.
  4. Ornelas, K.C. et al. (2000) The Cambridge World History of Food. Vol 2. ISBN 978-0-521-40216-3 | ISBN 0-521-40216-6
  5. Spud origin controversy solved. Biology News Net. Retrieved: 2009-03-30.
  6. Robinson, R. (1995). Return to Resistance, Breeding Crops to Reduce Pesticide Dependence, ISBN 0-88936-774-4.
  7. Kirkwood, I. (2009). Tasmanian Potato Cultivars. Tasmanian Food and Agriculture Dept. Retrieved: 2010-07-25.
  8. (2010). King Edward Seed Potatoes (Maincrop). Unwins Nurseries. Retrieved: 2008-03-30
  9. a b Dobies Nurseries King Edward. Retrieved: 2008-03-30
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
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Potato varieties
First early Accord · Maris Bard · Pentland javelin · Premiere · Rocket · Swift · Winston
Second early Anya · Carlingford · Charlotte · Estima · Marfona · Maris peer · Nadine · Osprey · Saxon · Vivaldi · Wilja
Maincrop Désirée · Golden Wonder · Harmony · King Edward · Maris Piper · Romano · Rooster · Sante

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